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Brighton looks to add development wayfinding signs

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By Crystal Nelson

BRIGHTON — After launching a series of wayfinding signs last year for major attractions across the city, the city of Brighton is looking to add wayfinding signs for the many new housing developments.

During the April 8 council meeting, assistant city manager for development Marv Falconburg outlined the possibility of reducing sign clutter and giving motorists a better sense for getting around Brighton.

“It has been successfully utilized by several other cities,” Falconburg said. “This group, Key Sign Plazas, has done programs in Aurora, Commerce City and Castle Rock under this same program. ... We’re excited about it because there sometimes can be a proliferation of development signs all around and on the weekends there’s small signs that go everywhere. This kind of helps reduce that. It cleans it up and it looks sharp. It’s cohesive.”

The cost of the program would be funded through existing fees paid by developers.

“It’s kind of a slam dunk deal and its not like we’re going to make a huge amount of money but it’s great that we don’t pay to have this done,” Falconburg said. “They pay us on a yearly basis.”

Councilwoman Cynthia Martinez wanted to know whether businesses other than housing developers would be included in the signage. Falconburg said the city code allows it, the question is whether they would want to incorporate it into their program, but the city does have the ability to regulate it through their licensing agreement. 

Councilwoman Joan Kniss suggested adding “proud participants in the 27J Capital Facilities Fee Foundation” at the top of the signs.

Councilman Ken Kreutzer said he’s all about marketing, advertising and signs but saw one of these signs while driving on 120th Ave and thought it looked like a yellow pages in a frame.

“If we could possibly add to it — each one promote a civic organization or the schools or something that would be part community as well — to maybe have it be dual purpose and maybe not be so much of an ad slick,” Kreutzer said.